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Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML)

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Objective   10/8/2017

HTML documentation
HTML 5 Tutorial

HTML   Hyper Text Markup Language  10/8/2017

HTML Tutorial for Beginners
by EJ Media / 23 videos / 116,338 views / Updated today


Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML)
[html4 Reference - Click HERE]


What is HTML?
HTML is a markup language for describing Web Documents (Web Pages)

HTML documents are described by HTML Tags
Each HTML Tag describes Different Document Content
A small HTML Example Document

HTML Tags

HTML Tags are KEYWORDS (Tag Names) surrounded by Angle Brackets:

<tagname >   content    </tagname >

HTML Tags normally come in pairs like <p> and </p> The First Tag in a Pair (Left to Right - Top to Bottom) is the START Tag, the Second Tag is the END Tag The End Tag is written like the Start Tag, but with a SLASH before the Tag Name

It IS Best Practice to Annotate Your Pages with Comments
Comment tags <!-- and --> are used to insert comments in HTML.
<!-- Write your comments here -->

Example Explained

The DOCTYPE declaration defines the document type to be HTML
The text between <html> and </html> describes an HTML Document
The text between <head> and </head> provides Information ABOUT the document. This IS Not Displayed in the Browser.
The text between <title> and </title> provides a Title for the Document
The text between <body> and </body> describes the VISIBLE Page Content
The text between <h1> and </h1> describes a Heading
The text between <p> and </p> describes a Paragraph

Using this description, a web browser can display a document with a heading and a paragraph.

Web Browsers

The purpose of a web browser Chrome / IE / Firefox / Safari is to read HTML documents and display them. The browser does not display the HTML tags, but uses them to determine how to display the document.

Below is a visualization of an HTML page structure:

<html>
<head>
<title>Page title</title>
</head>
<body>
<h1>This is a heading</h1>
<p>This is a paragraph.</p>
<p>This is another paragraph.</p>
</body>
</html>

ONLY the <body> area (the white area) is displayed by the browser.

HTML5     10/9/2017

HTML 5.1 W3C Working Draft, 10 March 2016
HTML5 Tutorials Playlist
by thenewboston / 53 videos / 1,192,516 views / Last updated on Jul 1, 2014


W3C Editor’s Draft 9 August 2010    [html5 Reference - Click HERE]

HTML5 is a markup language used for structuring and presenting content on the Web.
It was finalized, and published, on 28 October 2014 by the Web Consortium (W3C).
This is the fifth revision of the HTML standard since the inception of the Web.
The previous version, HTML 4, was standardized in 1997.

Its core aims are to improve the language with support for the latest multimedia while keeping it easily readable by humans and consistently understood by computers and devices (web browsers, parsers, etc.).

HTML5 is intended to subsume not only HTML 4, but also XHTML 1 and DOM Level 2 HTML.

Following its immediate predecessors HTML 4.01 and XHTML 1.1, HTML5 is a response to the fact that the HTML and XHTML in common use on the Web have a mixture of features introduced by various specifications, along with those introduced by software products such as web browsers and those established by common practice.

It is also an attempt to define a single markup language that can be written in either HTML or XHTML.

It includes detailed processing models to encourage more interoperable implementations; it extends, improves and rationalizes the markup available for documents, and introduces markup and application programming interfaces (APIs) for complex web applications.

For the same reasons, HTML5 is also a potential candidate for cross-platform mobile applications.

Many features of HTML5 have been designed with low-powered devices such as smartphones and tablets taken in to consideration.

In December 2011, research firm Strategy Analytics forecast sales of HTML5 compatible phones would top 1 billion in 2013.

In particular, HTML5 adds many new syntactic features.

These include the new video, audio and canvas elements, as well as the integration of scalable vector graphics (SVG) content (replacing generic object tags) and MathML for mathematical formulas.

These features are designed to make it easy to include and handle multimedia and graphical content on the web without having to resort to proprietary plugins and APIs.

Other new page structure elements, such as main, section, article, header, footer, aside, nav and figure, are designed to enrich the semantic content of documents.

New attributes have been introduced, some elements and attributes have been removed and some elements, such as a, cite and menu have been changed, redefined or standardized.

The APIs and Document Object Model (DOM) are no longer afterthoughts, but are fundamental parts of the HTML5 specification.

HTML5 also defines in some detail the required processing for invalid documents so that syntax errors will be treated uniformly by all conforming browsers and other user agents.

HTML Living Standard   10/9/2017

HTML Living Standard

For its first five years (1990-1995), HTML went through a number of revisions and experienced a number of extensions, primarily hosted first at CERN, and then at the IETF. With the creation of the W3C, HTML's development changed venue again. A first abortive attempt at extending HTML in 1995 known as HTML 3.0 then Although we have asked them to stop doing so, the W3C also republishes some parts of this specification as separate documents. made way to a more pragmatic approach known as HTML 3.2, which was completed in 1997. HTML4 quickly followed later that same year.

The following year, the W3C membership decided to stop evolving HTML and instead begin work on an XML-based equivalent, called XHTML. This effort started with a reformulation of HTML4 in XML, known as XHTML 1.0, which added no new features except the new serialization, and which was completed in 2000. After XHTML 1.0, the W3C's focus turned to making it easier for other working groups to extend XHTML, under the banner of XHTML Modularization. In parallel with this, the W3C also worked on a new language that was not compatible with the earlier HTML and XHTML languages, calling it XHTML2.

Around the time that HTML's evolution was stopped in 1998, parts of the API for HTML developed by browser vendors were specified and published under the name DOM Level 1 (in 1998) and DOM Level 2 Core and DOM Level 2 HTML (starting in 2000 and culminating in 2003). These efforts then petered out, with some DOM Level 3 specifications published in 2004 but the working group being closed before all the Level 3 drafts were completed.

In 2003, the publication of XForms, a technology which was positioned as the next generation of Web forms, sparked a renewed interest in evolving HTML itself, rather than finding replacements for it. This interest was borne from the realization that XML's deployment as a Web technology was limited to entirely new technologies (like RSS and later Atom), rather than as a replacement for existing deployed technologies (like HTML).

A proof of concept to show that it was possible to extend HTML4's forms to provide many of the features that XForms 1.0 introduced, without requiring browsers to implement rendering engines that were incompatible with existing HTML Web pages, was the first result of this renewed interest. At this early stage, while the draft was already publicly available, and input was already being solicited from all sources, the specification was only under Opera Software's copyright.

The idea that HTML's evolution should be reopened was tested at a W3C workshop in 2004, where some of the principles that underlie the HTML5 work (described below), as well as the aforementioned early draft proposal covering just forms-related features, were presented to the W3C jointly by Mozilla and Opera. The proposal was rejected on the grounds that the proposal conflicted with the previously chosen direction for the Web's evolution; the W3C staff and membership voted to continue developing XML-based replacements instead.

Shortly thereafter, Apple, Mozilla, and Opera jointly announced their intent to continue working on the effort under the umbrella of a new venue called the WHATWG. A public mailing list was created, and the draft was moved to the WHATWG site. The copyright was subsequently amended to be jointly owned by all three vendors, and to allow reuse of the specification.

The WHATWG was based on several core principles, in particular that technologies need to be backwards compatible, that specifications and implementations need to match even if this means changing the specification rather than the implementations, and that specifications need to be detailed enough that implementations can achieve complete interoperability without reverse-engineering each other.

The latter requirement in particular required that the scope of the HTML5 specification include what had previously been specified in three separate documents: HTML4, XHTML1, and DOM2 HTML. It also meant including significantly more detail than had previously been considered the norm.

In 2006, the W3C indicated an interest to participate in the development of HTML5 after all, and in 2007 formed a working group chartered to work with the WHATWG on the development of the HTML5 specification. Apple, Mozilla, and Opera allowed the W3C to publish the specification under the W3C copyright, while keeping a version with the less restrictive license on the WHATWG site.

For a number of years, both groups then worked together. In 2011, however, the groups came to the conclusion that they had different goals: the W3C wanted to publish a "finished" version of "HTML5", while the WHATWG wanted to continue working on a Living Standard for HTML, continuously maintaining the specification rather than freezing it in a state with known problems, and adding new features as needed to evolve the platform.

Since then, the WHATWG has been working on this specification (amongst others), and the W3C has been copying fixes made by the WHATWG into their fork of the document (which also has other changes).


Dive Into HTML5   10/9/2017

Dive Into HTML5

Dive Into HTML5 seeks to elaborate on a hand-picked Selection of features from the HTML5 specification and other fine Standards. The final manuscript has been published on paper by O’Reilly, under the Google Press imprint. Buy the printed Work — artfully titled “HTML5: Up & Running” — and be the first in your Community to receive it. Your kind and sincere Feedback is always welcome. The Work shall remain online under the CC-BY-3.0 License. The site is currently maintained by some html5homies.

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